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Kid's InfoBits

http://www.kidsclick.org/

Picture
Website
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Apple intro.

http://www.laobserved.com/manage/assets/Steve-Jobs-apple-100.jpg
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Front page; http://quotesnsmiles.com/picture-quotes/images-18-inspiring-steve-jobs-picture-quotes/
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http://apple-history.com/imac

Category 1: Question 4
proud of his company's creations, Apple co-founder Steve Jobs shows off the original Macintosh as it was launched in January 1984
proud of his company's creations, Apple co-founder Steve Jobs shows off the original Macintosh as it was launched in January 1984

http://www.worldculturepictorial.com/blog/content/
25-years-innovation-apples-unveiling-first-macintosh
-forever-changed-future-personal-computi

Category 1: Question 1
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http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/226865/Bill-Gates

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel_Kottke


http://www.macobserver.com/tmo/article/john_sculley_steve_jobs_was_never_fired_from_apple


http://about.intuit.com/about_intuit/executives/

Category 1: Question 2
won't show up
http://theflirtyguide.blogspot.com/2012/02/ultimate-silicon-valley-landmarks-tour.html

Category 1: Question 3

http://clubpenguin.wikia.com/wiki/List_of
_Emoticons- mad face

http://www.clipartbest.com/clipart-yckaB6McE
- nice face


http://www.123rf.com/stock-photo/smiley_face_cartoon.html -loving face
Category 1: Question 5

http://allaboutstevejobs.com/pics/picturesofsteve/picturesofsteve_01.php


Category 2: Question 1

http://eisengeiste.blogspot.com/2013/06/reed-college-atheism-communism-free-love.html


Category 2: Question 2

http://allaboutstevejobs.com/pics/picturesofsteve/picturesofsteve_01.php

Category 2: Question 3

http://chronicle.com/blognetwork/tenuredradical/2011/10/

Category 3: Question1

http://www.mobilereview101.com/apple-iphone-5-hd-wallpapers-for-free-download
.html


Category 3: Question 2

Fact Monster

Question
Source- title, website, magazine or book
What Information Did You Find
Now put it in your own words!
Category 1:
Apple



Question 1: What did Steve Jobs create at Apple? Why?
http://allabevejobs.com/bio/timeline.php

http://www.biography.com/people/steve-jobs-9354805#awesm=~oFzJkvPHQ0ZL49e

http://www.britannica.com/blogs/2011/08/steve-jobs-insanely-great/
Woz and Steve show the early Apple I board at the Homebrew Computer Club.
Steve and Woz start assembling Apple I computers in the Jobses' garage, and sell them to computer hobbyists, including 50 for the Byte Shop.
Steve Jobs and Woz show off the Apple I at the Personal Computing Festival in Atlantic City, with help from Dan Kottke.
Under Job's guidance, the company pioneered a series of revolutionary technologies, including the iPhone and iPad.
Steve wozniak and Steve Jobs introduced the new Apple I board at a Homebrew Computer Club.
Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak begin to assemble the Apple I computers in Steve Jobs car garage. Then both of them started to sell the computers to computer hobbyists. For example, Steve and Woz sold 50 computers to the Byte shop.
Steve Jobs and Woz bragged about the Apple I at a Personal Computer Festival in the Atlantic city, they had extra help by Dan Kottke. Steve Jobs invented the iPhone and iPad, those are a few of the revolutionary technologies that the people enjoy.




Question 2:
Did anyone help him with the technology?
http://allabevejobs.com/bio/timeline.php

http://blogs.computerworld.com/19179/bill_gates_i_helped_steve_jobs_create_the_mac
Steve Jobs meets Steve Wozniak, 5 years older, through a mutual friend. Woz and Steve share a love of electronics, Bob Dylan, and pranks.

Steve Jobs and Woz show off the Apple I at the Personal Computing Festival in Atlantic City, with help from Dan Kottke.
So, over the course of the 30 years we worked together, you know, he said a lot of very nice things about me and he said a lot of tough things.~Bill Gates

Steve Jobs hired PepsiCo CEO John Sculley with the famous phrase: "do you want to sell sugared water for the rest of your life, or do you want to come with me and change the world?" Sculley became Apple's CEO in 1983, and started a business honeymoon with Steve that lasted about two years.

Bill Campbell, often known as 'the coach' because of his college football career, joined Apple in 1983 to become VP of Marketing. He sided with Apple's board and pushed for Steve Jobs's departure in 1985, but left the company in 1987 to start Claris, then Intuit. However, he re-bounded with Steve later on, and was asked to join the Apple board in 1997.
Steve Jobs meet Steve Wozniak at 18 years old through other friends. Steve and Woz share interest in technology, Bob Dylan, and pulling pranks. Steve and Woz went to a computers festival, while they were there, they had help from Don Kotte. For more then 3 decades, Bill Gates and Steve Jobs worked together. Steve Jobs once hired a Pepsi CEO who's name was John Sculley in 1983. When John and Steve started their company together, the company only lasted 2 years. Bill Campbell joined Apple and became the VP of the marketing department in 1983. Bill Campbell left Apple in 2 years to start another company. Then, Bill Campbell came back to Apple 10 years later.




Question 3:
When did he start apple?
http://allaboutstevejobs.com/bio/timeline.php

http://web.uchile.cl/DctosIntranet/09Internet/CulturaDigital/BiografiaSteveJobs.pdf

v
Steve and Woz start assembling Apple I computers in the Jobses' garage, and sell them to computer hobbyists, including 50 for the Byte Shop.
Woz and Steve were the partners in crime for Apple industries. Both of them assembled the Apple I computers in the garage of Steve Jobs.




Question 4:
How did Steve Jobs come up with the technology he introduced?
http://www.britannica.com/blogs/2011/08/steve-jobs-insanely-great/

http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2394213,00.asp
Steve Jobs coddled his engineers and referred to them as artists, but his style was uncompromising; at one point he demanded a redesign of an internal circuit board simply because he considered it unattractive. He would later be renowned for his insistence that the Macintosh be not merely great but “insanely great.”
Jobs believed that Apple, as the only major personal computer maker with its own operating system, was in a unique position to innovate.
Innovate he did. In 1998, Jobs introduced the iMac, an egg-shaped, one-piece computer that offered high-speed processing at a relatively modest price and initiated a trend of high-fashion computers. (Subsequent models sported five different bright colors.) By the end of the year, the iMac was the nation’s highest-selling personal computer, and Jobs was able to announce consistent profits for the once-moribund company.
There are certainly the products—the iPod, iPhone, and iPad were all revolutionary in their own way, and I'll get to them in a minute—but Jobs' greatest achievement was more broad. He took the functional, sterile practice of "computing" and made it human. At one of his legendary keynotes, he said Apple wasn't just technology, that it was "tech and humanity."
Steve Jobs took care of his engineers and called them artists, but his trend was one of a kind. In 1998, Steve Jobs showed the world the iMac [ an egg shaped, one piece computer, super fast, high speed processing, at a realistic price and the latest trend at the time].
Of course, there is the stupendous iPod, iPhone, and iPad which are all great in their own ways. He made the technology assessable for everyone so everybody is able to use the technology we are so grateful for.




Question 5: How did Steve Jobs affect the lives at Apple?
http://allaboutstevejobs.com/persona/steveatwork.php

http://www.informing-arts.biz/remembering-stevevv
http
/
As early as 1987, the New York Times wrote: "by the early 80's, Mr. Jobs was widely hated at Apple. Senior management had to endure his temper tantrums. He created resentment among employees by turning some into stars and insulting others, often reducing them to tears. Mr. Jobs himself would frequently cry after fights with fellow executives".
Under Steve’s lead­er­ship and this gal­va­niz­ing vision, Apple became a role model and a source of inspi­ra­tion for peo­ple, busi­nesses and schools every­where. A source of end­less delight to con­sumers, touch­ing hun­dreds of mil­lions, if not bil­lions of peo­ple around the world.
I pro­foundly hope that the peo­ple of Apple remain inspired by and shaped by Steve’s val­ues and pas­sion­ate com­mit­ment to excel­lence. If so, we can look for­ward to Apple inno­va­tions that spark our imag­i­na­tion (and unlock our wal­lets) for years to come.
Steve Jobs personality was hot and cold. He was nice to some employees , mean to others , regardless all of the consumers loved him because of his inventions.
Category 2:
Childhood



Question 1 :
Did Steve Jobs childhood activities affect his career?
http://www.biography.com/people/steve-jobs-9354805#awesm=~oFtFS9GrUvhcQQ

http://allaboutstevejobs.com/bio/timeline.php
As a boy, Jobs and his father would work on electronics in the family garage.
A hobby which instilled confidence, tenacity and mechanical prowess in young Jobs.
Steve carried on his passion for electroni.cs through his whole life. Steve's time spent in his family's garage playing with wires and fuses sparked his interest and gave him confidence and knowledge in electronics.




Question 2 :
Where did Steve Jobs go to collage?
http://dailycaller.com/2012/11/22/15-ultra-successful-people-who-never-graduated-from-college-slideshow/steve-jobs-cc-matt-buchanan/#ixzz33KSxRP8R

http://allaboutstevejobs.com/bio/longbio/longbio_01.php
Steve external image icon1.png dropped out of Reed external image icon1.png in Portland after a mere six months. However, he spent much of the next two years crashing in dorm rooms and dropping in on classes, including a calligraphy course that, Jobs said, was largely responsible for the Mac’s multitude of typefaces.
Steve dropped out of Reed College in Portland, Oregon after about 6 months into school. Though, after he dropped out, he dropped into the classes at Reed for 2 years.




Question 3:
Was he a smart kid?
http://www.biography.com/people/steve-jobs-9354805#early-life&awesm=~oFXSTYHFpnf4Ab


http://web.uchile.cl/DctosIntranet/09Internet/CulturaDigital/BiografiaSteveJobs.pdf
While Jobs has always been an intelligent and innovative thinker, his youth was riddled with frustrations over formal schooling. A prankster in elementary school, Jobs's fourth-grade teacher needed to bribe him to study. Jobs tested so well, however, that administrators wanted to skip him ahead to high school—a proposal that his parents declined.
The teacher
for the advanced class was a spunky woman named Imogene Hill, known as “Teddy,” and she became, Jobs said, “one of the saints of my life.”
After watching him for a couple of weeks, she figured that the best way to handle him was to bribe him. “After school one day, she gave me this
workbook with math problems in it, and she said, ‘I want you to take it home and do this.’ And I thought, ‘Are you nuts?’ And then she pulled out one
of these giant lollipops that seemed as big as the world. And she said, ‘When you’re done with it, if you get it mostly right, I will give you this and five
dollars.’ And I handed it back within two days.” After a few months, he no longer required the bribes. “I just wanted to learn and to please her.”
Steve was always a smart one, but his childhood was full of frustrations over school. Steve was also a prankster in the lower school. His fourth-grade teacher had to bribe him to get his work done. For example, the teacher would bribe him by saying, " When you are done with all the problems, and you have got most of them correct, then I will give you a giant lollipop and 5 dollars."
Category 3:
Oddball



Question 1:
Did anyone ever think bad about him?
http://technology.inquirer.net/5713/steve-jobs-a-genius-but-a-bad-mean-manager


http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2011/11/be-a-jerk-the-worst-business-lesson-from-the-steve-jobs-biography/249136/
“He’s not warm and fuzzy … He was not the world’s greatest manager. In fact, he could have been one of the world’s worst managers,” Isaacson said on Sunday in an interview with “60 Minutes” on CBS.
“You know, he was a pretty abrasive, and in some ways, you know, a cantankerous character,” Isaacson said
Apple's founder and CEO could be a cruel and nasty guy.
One of Steve Jobs employees insisted, “ He’s not warm and fuzzy … He was not the world’s greatest manager. In fact, he could have been one of the world’s worst managers,” Isaacson said on Sunday in an interview with “60 Minutes” on CBS. The same employee also answered with this,
“You know, he was a pretty abrasive, and in some ways, you know, a cantankerous character."
Other Apple acquaints pondered that, Steve Jobs was a cruel and nasty man.




Question 2:
Why is he so famous?
http://www.fastcodesign.com/1664863/what-made-steve-jobs-so-great


`http://www.forbes.com/sites/billbarol/2011/10/05/why-steve-jobs-mattered/
Steve Jobs wasn't an engineer or a designer. But he was one of the greatest users of technology of all time, and that made all the difference.
Rather, it was in a dusty basement of the Apple campus.
one of the signal aspects of Jobs’ genius — and there’s an overworked word I try very hard not to use loosely — was his ability to make consumers feel personally attached to inanimate lumps of silicon and steel, to make them things about which people feel deeply. With the Macintosh, later with the iPhone, and still later with the iPad, Jobs managed to forge something large and transformative. He helped to create a generation of consumers who would to a large degree communicate and self-educate and even comprehend the world via information-handling devices. It was Jobs’ insight that these devices could be defined by the things that obsessed Jobs himself — beauty, quality and utility.
Steve Jobs was a great technology producer . The reason why this multi millionaire is such a big deal is because he made a change in the Apple basement. Steve was able to make the customers feel attached to the piece of technology that they just bought .